Noteworthy title

On Defining Design …
So let’s go further and define design as the overt, thoughtful development of the interaction points between you and your customer. This definition includes the obvious interaction point of the thing that you touch, wear, eat, watch, listen to, or drive and moves to a less obvious interaction point: the catalyst of all the emotions you experience when you interact with a company in some way. If we boil down this idea to its point of intensity, effective design establishes the emotional relationship you develop with a brand through the total experience, to which a service or product provides a portal.
Do you matter? How great design will make people love your company
Robert Brunner & Stewart Emery
c 2009 FT Press

In creating a broader definition of design, we include the emotions and feelings that arise to become part of the relationship people have with your company through every touch point that they experience. You don’t want to let other people define this for you. If you’re really smart about it, you define it. You can’t entirely control it because people create their own version of the relationship, but you can commit to influencing this in every way you can.
Do you matter? How great design will make people love your company
Robert Brunner & Stewart Emery
c 2009 FT Press

On Design Driven Culture …
Why is it so important that design be part of all aspects of your business, from end to the other? What is a design-driven company? It’s where any company begins by putting experience in the centre and then working outward from there. You can look at companies whose core offering might be technology or maybe a service, and it’s design driven when it’s shaped and driven by what customers see, experience, and value. For these companies, that’s what drives development — marketing and sales, even manufacturing and distribution. It all comes from the idea of “What are we designing for people, for what emotional response, and how do we do that?”
Do you matter? How great design will make people love your company
Robert Brunner & Stewart Emery
c 2009 FT Press

It’s about human experience. It’s about things you have to do that you can’t measure. You have faith that this is, in fact, important, and you have to trust your instincts. These are all things that go into the commitment to design a design driven culture. …When you make the shift to an integrated design experience that permeates all aspects of your company’s development, manufacturing, delivery and follow-up flows, you end up with a far stronger brand.
Do you matter? How great design will make people love your company
Robert Brunner & Stewart Emery
c 2009 FT Press


On Defining Branding …
Your brand should be as alive as a person. Another way to look at brand is that it is like an individual’s character. That’s really what a brand is, the embodiment of a company’s character.
Do you matter? How great design will make people love your company
Robert Brunner& Stewart Emery
c 2009 FT Press

On Brand Positioning …
The classic book Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind, by Al Ries and Jack Trout (McGraw-Hill, 2000), introduced a new idea: the notion that a product’s success is based on how it is positioned in the mind of the prospect, not the attributes the product may have. …Positioning presents a different kind of challenge in the modern brand world. At a time when consumer desire and demand drives marketing, brand positioning can determine product adoption and success. The problem is that too many brands are jockeying to position themselves just right. Most product categories already have leaders, so a new brand coming into the category must find a counter-position to succeed.
The Breakaway Brand: How Great Brands Stand Out
Francis J. Kelly & Barry Silverstein
c 2005 McGraw-Hill

On Brand Truth …
… defining characteristics of the break away brand: winning positioning, continuous innovation, audience insight, targeting a winning mind set, creating a category of one, relentless integration. Underneath it all lies the simple fact that every great brand is built on a truth.
…Ultimately, the DNA of a breakaway brand is its brand truth, which can inform every other decision a brand marketer has to make — decisions that prove the brand is authentic and not a fabrication. The brand truth is the single most important weapon a brand will ever have in the battle for increased awareness, profitability, market share and even share price.
The Breakaway Brand: How Great Brands Stand Out
Francis J. Kelly & Barry Silverstein
c 2005 McGraw-Hill

On Brand Promise …
The brand-builder’s creed is "keep the promises." There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that values — our codes of behaviour – drive long-term brand success. Therefore, understanding how cultural values underpin notions of authenticity within Canada’s diverse communities is a huge – and largely untapped – competitive advantage.
Ikonica: A Field Guide to Canada's Brandscape
Jeannette Hanna & Alan Middleton
c 2008 Douglas & MacIntyre

On the Need to Brand …
Perhaps our motivations to brand, and to be branded, comes form our hardwired instinct to connect — perhaps not. In either case, what is indisputable is the breakneck speed with which brands have become more persuasive over the past century, and the number of people who have literally adn figuratively bought into these brands. Any knowledge of culture is impossible now without an understanding of the implications of "brand." We have entered a day and and age where brand is an extension of human facility, whether it is psychic or psychological.
Brand Bible
Debbie Millman
c 2012 Rockport


On Innovation …
Innovation may be immensely popular as a business buzzword – Michael Beirut declared that among corporate executives "innovation is the new black" – but the reality is that people talk about it far more than they achieve it. Business people may tend to think of some small tweak in their production process, or a new button added to a gadget, as an innovation. But as the designer Greg Van Alstyne notes, an innovation, by definition, should produce significant change in the marketplace and/or in people's lives.

By that standard, new technology doesn't necessarily result in innovation unless it is utilized in a way that brings about meaningful change. That distinction has been lost on many in the business world, says business strategy guru Patrick Whitney. "A lot of business people figure that innovation and technology were the same thing — that if you had the capability of making more stuff, or putting in more features, you were innovating."
Glimmer
Warren Berger
c2009 Random House Canada

Is it a Font or a Typeface?
Fonts were once known as founts. Fonts and founts weren't the same as typefaces, and typefaces weren't the same as type. The two were used interchangeably as early as the 1920s …. But most people have stopped caring. There are two more important things to worry about, such as what the word actually means. In the days when type was set by hand, a font was a complete set of letters of a typeface in one particular size and style — every different a, b and c in upper and lower case, each pound or dollar sign and punctuation mark. These days font refers usually to the digital, computerized form of a particular typeface. Each typeface may have a family of several fonts (bold, italic, condensed, semibold italic, etc.), each weight and style on the page a little different. But in common parlance we use font and typeface interchangeably, and there are worse sins.
Just My Type
Simon Garfield
c 2010 Gotham Books

On Information Design …
In a complex world, clear and accessible communication, across a broad range of media, has become essential. Information design addresses this need by blending typography, illustration, communication studies, ergonomics, psychology, sociology, linguistics, computer science Aden a variety of other fields to create concise and unambiguous messages. While virtually all forms of design are human-centred, information design focuses on the accurate representation of specific knowledge sets and the unique needs of the end user receiving that content.
The Information Design Handbook
Jenn & Ken Visocky O'Grady
c 2008 HOW Books